Tenant Insurance

Tenant insurance offers benefits to members by paying for temporary accommodation and replacing damaged property in the event of a fire, flood, theft or other catastrophe.

Attached is a document outlining the insurance coverage offered by Cooperators. 


Cooperators tenant insurance

Housing Services Corporation, a non-profit organization which offers services in the social housing sector, also offers similar insurance. It may be cheaper.
http://www.hscorp.ca/our-programs-and-services/insurance/

For more information about HSC's insurance, see this document.

 

Grew Up in Woodsworth, Live Here But Not a Member?

Did you grow up in the Co-op, live here but aren't a member? The committee will be holding Educational Interviews for Turning 16’s, teenagers who have grown up in Woodsworth and are at least 16 years of age. 

The interview session is being held on Thursday, June 1 in the the  Boardroom starting at 7:00 pm. If you are interested in attending, please let us know by emailing the committee.

The committee has also recently decided to open these interviews to any young people  who have grown up in the Co-op and are currently living in the Co-op, but have not yet become a member. Please email the committee with your name, age, who your parents are, how many years you've lived in the co-op and what unit you are living in, to see if you qualify to attend this session.

Email – woodsworthmembership@gmail.com

Cooperatively yours,

the Membership Committee

Ontario’s Apology Act

At a human rights workshop in the co-op, we learned that Ontario has an Apology Act, which came into force in Ontario on April 23, 2009. It allows us to express sorrow or regret without worrying that the comments can later be used against us in a civil lawsuit.

Yes, that means that you can say you are sorry, and this apology can’t be used to prove you are responsible for whatever you apologized for. 
An apology:
    • is not an admission of liability,
    • does not void or impair an insurance contract, and
    • is not taken into account in determining liability

But don’t admit liability. If you run into someone else’s car, you can say you are terribly sorry that this happened, but don’t say it was all your fault.  An admission of liability is still an admission of liability.

An apology is often key to the healing process; it can promote accountability and transparency and shorten or avoid litigation.

Here's the legislation:

Apology Act, S.O. 2009, c3.
Consolidation Period: From April 23, 2009 to the e-Laws currency date. No Amendments.

Definition

1. In this Act,

“apology” means an expression of sympathy or regret, a statement that a person is sorry or any other words or actions indicating contrition or commiseration, whether or not the words or actions admit fault or liability or imply an admission of fault or liability in connection with the matter to which the words or actions relate. 2009, c. 3, s. 1.

Effect of apology on liability

2. (1) An apology made by or on behalf of a person in connection with any matter,

(a) does not, in law, constitute an express or implied admission of fault or liability by the person in connection with that matter;

(b) does not, despite any wording to the contrary in any contract of insurance or indemnity and despite any other Act or law, void, impair or otherwise affect any insurance or indemnity coverage for any person in connection with that matter; and

(c) shall not be taken into account in any determination of fault or liability in connection with that matter. 2009, c. 3, s. 2 (1).

Exception

(2) Clauses (1) (a) and (c) do not apply for the purposes of proceedings under the Provincial Offences Act. 2009, c. 3, s. 2 (2).

Evidence of apology not admissible

(3) Despite any other Act or law, evidence of an apology made by or on behalf of a person in connection with any matter is not admissible in any civil proceeding, administrative proceeding or arbitration as evidence of the fault or liability of any person in connection with that matter. 2009, c. 3, s. 2 (3).

Exception

(4) However, if a person makes an apology while testifying at a civil proceeding, including while testifying at an out of court examination in the context of the civil proceeding, at an administrative proceeding or at an arbitration, this section does not apply to the apology for the purposes of that proceeding or arbitration. 2009, c. 3, s. 2 (4).

Criminal or provincial offence proceeding or conviction

3. Nothing in this Act affects,

(a) the admissibility of any evidence in, 

(i) a criminal proceeding, including a prosecution for perjury, or

(ii) a proceeding under the Provincial Offences Act; or

(b) the use that may be made in the proceedings referred to in subsection 2 (3) of a conviction for a criminal or provincial offence. 2009, c. 3, s. 3.

Acknowledgment, Limitations Act, 2002

4. For the purposes of section 13 of the Limitations Act, 2002, nothing in this Act,

(a) affects whether an apology constitutes an acknowledgment of liability; or

(b) prevents an apology from being admitted in evidence. 2009, c. 3, s. 4.

5. Omitted (provides for coming into force of provisions of this Act). 2009, c. 3, s. 5.

6. Omitted (enacts short title of this Act). 2009, c. 3, s. 6.

Source:  https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/09a03

Finding information on our website – a tip sheet

The attached tip sheet highlights some of the ways you can search our website.

  • Use the Navigation Bar (Home, By-Laws,  Photos, The Weekly, etc.
  • Use the Recent Posts for the newest content on the site
  • Use the Committees & Topics menu – categories – click to see the posts in date order.
  • Use the search box. Type a keyword or two.  
  • Use the Site Map on the Navigation Bar

Click on Download to see all these search tools on our website highlighted.

 

Participation By-Law #23

WOODSWORTH HOUSING CO-OPERATIVE, INC.

THE PARTICIPATION BY-LAW (No. 23)

(passed Jan. 23, 1984 as By-law No. 11) Reconfirmed by members on September 30, 2010 as part of the adoption of the consolidated by-laws.

1. Each member shall participate in the operations of the Co-op by sitting on the Board or a committee, or volunteering time in some other area of the Co-op's operation. Each member will be expected to contribute an average of four hours per month.

2. Members will be required, upon joining the Co-op and annually thereafter, to list the activities and/or committees for which they are available.

3. Each member will normally give a minimum of one year commitment to the chosen participation activity.

4. Each year the Board will provide an up-to-date list of Approved Volunteer Activities, with provisions for members to make particular individual requests.

5. Members who have contributed an average of eight (8) hours or more a month may apply for a one year sabbatical.

6. A member may apply to the Board for exemption from this participation requirement for reasons of health or employment or others acceptable to the Board.

7. No member will be considered in breach of this policy if there are no volunteer positions open.

8. Breach of this policy will affect a member's status in the Co-op.

9. An Annual Survey of the Membership shall include an outline of "Implementation Procedures" as they exist at that time.

Consolidated up to April 2010 and adopted by the members on September 30, 2010.

Rules of Order for general members’ meetings

Rules of Order adopted by Woodsworth Housing Co-operative membership, March 27, 1979

CONDUCT OF BUSINESS
For most items of business, a decision by the General Meeting is required. Decisions come about as follows: the item is presented and a motion is made and seconded; the motion is debated, and possibly amended; and the meeting votes on the motion.

1. MOTIONS
As each item on the agenda comes up for discussion, it is introduced by the Chair and/or a presentation is made by the sponsor. The sponsor may have a specific proposal for the meeting or, after some discussion, it may become apparent that the Co-op should make a decision about the item, in which case a motion should be proposed and seconded. Every main motion should be submitted to the Chair in written form. (This does not include Procedural motions.)

2. SPEAKING
Once a motion has been made and seconded, it is debated by the meeting, with debate regulated by the Chair. Speakers must speak for or against the proposal and the chair may rule a speaker out of order if his or her comments are not relevant to the motion. All remarks should be addressed to the Chair, rather than any particular member at the meeting. Each speaker may only speak for five minutes or less at a time. At the discretion of the Chair, no person may speak more than once on the same item until all members present who wish to speak on the item have done so.

All persons desiring to speak must raise their hand until acknowledged by the Chair. The Chair will maintain a “speakers’ list” of all persons requesting to speak and will allow them to speak in order.

3. AMENDMENTS
During debate on a main motion, amendments to the motion may be introduced. An amendment may delete part of the main motion, add to it, or change parts of it, but can not be contrary to the intent of the motion.

An amendment must be moved and seconded. If the mover and seconder of the main motion agree to the amendment, it immediately becomes part of the main motion. If they do not agree, a vote must be taken on the amendment.

Once the amendment has been moved and seconded, all speakers must address the amendment rather than the main motion. The Chair will keep a separate speakers’ list for the debate of the amendment. When the meeting is ready to vote on the amendment(s), the Chair will review all the amendments and then take a separate vote on each. Those that pass are incorporated into the main motion and debate continues on the main motion as amended using the main speakers’ list, until the meeting is ready for the vote on the main motion or another amendment is proposed.

Occasionally, a member wishes to amend a motion by replacing it with a whole new motion. This is not allowed as a valid amendment. However, the member may briefly outline the substitute motion and either ask the mover to withdraw the motion on the floor or urge the meeting to defeat it so that the substitute motion can be proposed.

4. WITHDRAWING MOTION
The mover of a motion may withdraw the motion from the floor. This would be done if the mover has decided no decision should be made at this time, or to allow a substitute motion to be made.

5. CALLING THE QUESTION
During the debate of a main motion or an amendment, any speaker, in their turn, and other than the mover or seconder, may call for a vote on the question or “call the question”. This is an attempt to end debate on a motion and vote without allowing any more discussion. Because a motion to “call the question” may take away some members’ right to speak, it should be used carefully. Before proposing to “call the question”, there should be some indication that most members have made up their minds, and that speakers are not contributing any new arguments.

A motion to “call the question” requires a seconder and may not be debated. In order to be carried, the motion to “call the question” requires a 2/3 majority. If the motion is defeated, debate on the main motion or amendment continues. If the motion to “call the question” is carried, then the meeting is ready to vote on the main motion or amendment on the floor. The Chair should take the vote with no further debate.

6. DEFERRING THE QUESTION
During the debate on a main motion or an amendment, any speaker, in his or her turn, can move to “defer the question” to a subsequent meeting. This is an attempt to postpone a decision on the proposal on the floor until a future date or until after a specific action or decision has happened. A motion to “defer the question” does not need to be seconded. The mover, or if the mover declines, one other person may speak in favour of deferring the proposal, and one person may speak against deferring. A vote on the motion to “defer the question” is then taken. If carried, the proposal is deferred as per the motion. If it is defeated, debate continues on the main motion or amendment.

7. INTERRUPTIONS
Members may only speak out of turn if they wish to raise a point of order or a point of information. To raise such a point, a member stands and with as much courtesy as possible, interrupts the current speaker or the Chair and announces that they wish to raise a point of order or information. The Chair may accept or reject such an interruption at its discretion.

If the Chair acknowledges the member, the point should be stated simply and briefly, and the member should sit down. A point of order should be raised when a member feels that an incorrect procedure is being followed, there is a better procedure, the Chair has made an incorrect ruling, or there is a lack of quorum. Once a point of order has been stated, the Chair will rule on its validity and, if appropriate, act on it. A point of information should be raised when a member feels that he or she has an important piece of information relating to the item under consideration that may save needless debate if it is raised immediately instead of at the member’s turn to speak.

8. DILATORY MOTIONS
The Chair may rule a motion out of order on the grounds that it is absurd, frivolous, obstructive, delaying or otherwise dilatory.

This simplified version of Robert’s Rules of Order was adopted by Woodsworth members prior to the first members moving into Woodsworth Housing Co-operative.